App Inventor to run on iPhones? Yes. How about Windows and Mac OS X? #AppInventor #Stem

MIT has announced that App Inventor will run on iPhones and iPads, hopefully by spring of 2018. You can help make that happen by making a donation to their effort – go to http://appinventor.mit.edu and follow the links to make a donation!

Did you know that you can run App Inventor Android apps on Windows and Mac OS X? Sure can!

All you need is to install an Android simulator for Windows or Mac and then install your App Inventor .apk app into the simulator. This way you can run your apps on Windows or Mac!

This short video shows you how to do that – take a look!

 

There are several Android simulators for both Windows and Mac OS X.

This video demonstrates using BlueStacks for Windows (also available for Mac OS X) and Nox App Player for Mac OS X.

MIT App Inventor team receives Distinguished Leadership Award from the Mass Technology Leadership Council

The MIT App Inventor team accepted the Council’s Distinguished Leadership Award for working to make application development universally accessible.

Source: Wayfair CEO Niraj Shah, athenahealth, and Toast Take Top Honors at 20th Annual Mass Technology Leadership Awards

Congratulations to the team! Well done! Well deserved!

Appy Builder – an alternative to MIT App Inventor, with more features

AppyBuilder is a commercial version of MIT App Inventor that, for a monthly subscription fee, provides access to many additional components and features. Some of these features include monetization services that work with advertising networks to display ads with your apps, plus unique features like SQL Lite and the Android Material Design user interface.  You can also add in-app purchases.

There is also a free version that operates similar to MIT App Inventor. You can set up your free account at the Appy Builder web site or sign up for a subscription account with added features.

AppyBuilder is based on MIT App Inventor – if you know how to use App Inventor, you’ll find AppyBuilder very easy to use. The company behind AppBuilder also does custom app development and mobile web site development.

Click on their “Tell me more” button, and then page down to see the description of features and services, and subscription options.

I’ve played a bit with the “free” version but I could see buying a monthly subscription to access several of their enhanced features. Their lead architect also has a blog including this tutorial on how to use their components to access the web, camera and upload photos to a server using App Builder.

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Since I moved the web site from my own server over to the WordPress platform, you will often see posts authored by “Coldstreams”, or sometimes “AppinventorPlus”, rather than my name, EdwardM, that appeared on the old web site. I have 4 separate accounts on WordPress and set them up so that my Coldstreams account can update any of the blogs, including this one. Most of my posts will likely appear with the “Coldstreams” name, but it is still just me 🙂 … EdwardM

Thunkable turns programming into a drag-and-drop solution – based on App Inventor

Thunkable is a spin off of the MIT App Inventor project. If you can program in App Inventor, you can program in Thunkable. Their goal is to get the App Inventor concept running on both Android and iOS (iPhone).

Visit Thunkable at http://thunkable.com

Thunkable, built on top of the open-source project MIT App Inventor, is a visual programming tool

Source: Thunkable turns programming into a drag-and-drop solution – SD Times

There are indications that MIT App Inventor will focus on education and training applications and that spin offs will offer more powerful (and likely complex) features such as increased database functionality or media handling. These new features, oriented perhaps towards businesses and organizations (rather than education) might become a subscription service – but with added value in terms of features and capabilities.

Interest in App Inventor continues to grow

The following chart comes from Google Trends, and reflects the growing interest in App Inventor, based on searches for “MIT App Inventor” on Google.

MITAppInventorTrend

Because App Inventor has been viewed as a training tool in K-12 level schools, and some introductory college courses, searches for App Inventor information have gone down during the northern hemisphere summer months, when school is not normally in session. This accounts for the up and down movement in the trend line.

This chart shows a relative level of interest for the top countries searching for “MIT App Inventor”.

Region