App Inventor to run on iPhones? Yes. How about Windows and Mac OS X? #AppInventor #Stem

MIT has announced that App Inventor will run on iPhones and iPads, hopefully by spring of 2018. You can help make that happen by making a donation to their effort – go to http://appinventor.mit.edu and follow the links to make a donation!

Did you know that you can run App Inventor Android apps on Windows and Mac OS X? Sure can!

All you need is to install an Android simulator for Windows or Mac and then install your App Inventor .apk app into the simulator. This way you can run your apps on Windows or Mac!

This short video shows you how to do that – take a look!

 

There are several Android simulators for both Windows and Mac OS X.

This video demonstrates using BlueStacks for Windows (also available for Mac OS X) and Nox App Player for Mac OS X.

Raspberry Pi 2 (US $35) computer board features Scratch

Raspberry Pi 2 is a US$ 35 computer board to which you attach a monitor, keyboard, mouse and Ethernet connection. You can use the Pi 2 for web browsing and other functions, but it also comes with Scratch.

Scratch is a programming system that is very similar to MIT App Inventor. You can learn more about Scratch in our previous post on that topic!

But because one of Raspberry Pi’s goals is to advance computer science education, there’s a few pieces of bundled software that can help achieve that goal. This includes a drag-and-drop visual programming language called Scratch (great for beginners to create animations and games), as well as Sonic Pi (for creating electronic music) and more advanced programming languages like Python (also included).

via Surf Report: Taking a bite out of Raspberry Pi.

And speaking of STEM, here are some videos from yesterday’s Oregon City FRC FIRST Robotics Pacific Northwest District 2 (Oregon) robotics competition. 35 high school robotic teams took part, with Team #4488 “Shockwave” taking first by total points. I am biased: I am a volunteer engineering mentor with the Shockwave team, from Glencoe High School, Hillsboro, Oregon. Go Shockwave!

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“100 Best App Inventor Tutorial Videos”

This is a machine generated list of App Inventor tutorial videos. I have no idea which ones are the best (some appear to be out of date, for AI version 1) but you might find these links of use:

Link updated March 24, 2017 – try this one:

100 Best AppInventor Tutorial Videos | Meta-Guide.com.

 

Sensors: How to use the Orientation Sensor

Smart phones and tablets contain several kinds of “sensors” to sense information about their environment. For example, an accelerometer provides information about movement of the phone (or tablet) – letting us know the speed and direction of travel in x, y and z coordinates (three dimensions).

The orientation sensor tells us if the phone is tilted to the left or right, or up or down (or flipped over). App Inventor provides a simple to use interface to the orientation sensor. We can use this to control a sprite or ball on the screen – by tilting our phone, we can make graphic items move around on the screen!

Sample source code that you can download is at the bottom of this post!

After going through this tutorial, you now know enough to create your own interactive smart phone game!

Review

Before we get started, please review these earlier tutorials:

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App Inventor 2 – Tutorial #1 Introduction

This introduction is for those completely new to App Inventor – What is it? How does it work? Why should I be interested?

I have scripted out about 4 more, so far, but recording them may be delayed as construction crews are ripping up and repaving the road outside my office during the next few days.